Creamy White Gazpacho, A Refreshing Cold Soup for Hot Summer Days

Creamy White Gazpacho, A Refreshing Cold Soup for Hot Summer Days

This unusual white gazpacho, with roots in the Màlaga region of Spain, is light, creamy and refreshing.  It feels like a spoil, but is actually extremely healthy.  It makes an elegant light lunch for summer’s hottest days. 

Nowadays, gazpacho is synonymous with summer’s ripest capsicums and tomatoes.  However, its ancient origins are very different. Tomatoes and capsicums were brought to Europe from the Americas long after gazpacho was first eaten in ancient Rome.

Apparently, gazpacho originally consisted of stale bread, soaked in water to soften it and create the “soup”.  Other ingredients, such as almonds, olive oil, and garlic were added according to season, region, and availability.  The tomatoes and capsicums we associate with gazpacho today arrived hundreds of years later.

Màlaga is a Spanish region, well known for its sweet white wines.  Thus, it’s unsurprising to discover that its famous white gazpacho is made with white grapes.


Creamy White Gazpacho, A Refreshing Cold Soup Hot Summer Days | cookglobaleatlocal.com

About this Recipe

Creamy White Gazpacho, A Refreshing Cold Soup Hot Summer Days | cookglobaleatlocal.comI first encountered the recipe for white gazpacho in the LA Times back in 2012.  The recipe intrigued me because it comes from a restaurant in Martha’s Vineyard where the Obama’s ate during summer holidays.  It also involves fresh white grapes — of which we normally have an abundance towards the end of summer.  Moreover, a light, cold soup, such as this one, is always a refreshing starter.

As far as I can tell, the original recipe for white gazpacho involves stale bread and almonds, rather than cucumbers.  However, this lighter, gluten-free version, where almonds are a condiment rather than a central ingredient, appealed to my modern ideas about healthy eating.

Moreover, cucumbers have a natural cooling effect on the body.  Thus, their addition to this version of the soup makes it even more appealing as a summer starter.

If you strain the soup — as I did — it makes a highly refined dish, appropriate for the fanciest of parties.  Otherwise, you will wind up with a fibre rich, hearty soup which is ideal for everyday family dining.  Either way, I hope your family enjoys this refreshing summer soup as much as mine does.  Bon appétit!

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